Monday, 16 May 2016

Scotch Pie


I was asked about Scotch Pie, here is the info I have about them.





Scotch pie or mutton pie is a small, double-crust meat pie filled with minced mutton or other meat.[1] It may also be known as ashell pie or mince pie (although the latter term is ambiguous) to differentiate it from other varieties of savoury pie, such as the steak piesteak and kidney pie, steak-and-tattie (potato) pie, and so forth. The Scotch pie is believed to originate in Scotland, but can be found in other parts of the United Kingdom, and is widely sold all over Canada. They are often sold alongside other types of hot food in football grounds, traditionally accompanied by a drink of Bovril, resulting in the occasional reference to football pies.
The traditional filling of mutton is often highly spiced with pepper and other ingredients and is placed inside a shell of hot water crust pastry. An individual piemaker's precise recipe, including the types and quantities of spice used, is usually kept a close secret, for fear of imitations. It is baked in a round, straight-sided tin, about 8 cm in diameter and 4 cm high, and the top "crust" (which is soft) is placed about 1 cm lower than the rim to make a space for adding accompaniments such as mashed potatoesbaked beansbrown saucegravy or an egg.
Scotch pies are often served hot by take-away restaurants and bakeries, and at outdoor events. The hard crust of the pie enables it to be eaten by hand with no wrapping. Typically there is a round hole of about 7.5mm in the centre of the top crust, which has given rise to the colloquial name 'chimney pie' in Scotland.
We have ours with baked beans and mashed potato, occasionally I fill the top of the pie with gravy made from Lamb stock, tomato puree and crushed garlic.
Recipe
Ingredients for the Meat Filling: 
1 pound (500g or two cups) lean lamb, minced (ground) 
Pinch of mace or nutmeg 
Salt and pepper 
Quarter pint (150ml) gravy
Ingredients for the Hot Water Pastry:
1 pound (500g or four cups) plain flour
6 ounces (175g or � cup) lard
6 fluid ounces (225ml or � cup) approximately of water
Pinch of salt
Milk for glazing
You will also need glasses or jars, approximately 3-3� inches (7.5-8.5cm) in diameter to shape the pie.
Method:
Create the filling by mixing the minced (ground) lamb, spice and seasoning.
Make the pastry by sifting the flour and salt into a warm bowl. Make a well in the centre of the flour. Melt the lard in a scant measure of water and, when it is bubbling, add to the flour and mix thoroughly. Take a small amount (remember the mixture should make 8/10 pies, with their tops) and form into a ball and keep the rest warm while making each pastry case. This is done by rolling a suitable amount for each pie and shaping the crust round the base of a glass or jar approximately 3-3� inches (7.5-8.5cm) in diameter. Make sure there are no cracks in the pastry - you can trim round the top of the case to make it even. As the pastry cools and gets cool, remove the glass and continue until you have about a quarter of the pastry left to make the lids.
Fill the cases with the meat and add the gravy to make the meat moist.
Roll the remaining pastry and use the glass to cut the lids. Wet the edges of the lids, place over the meat and press down lightly over the filling. Pinch the edges and trim. Cut a small hole or vent in the centre of the lid (to allow the steam to escape).
Glaze with milk and bake for about 45 minutes at 275F/140C/Gas mark 1. If the pies are not eaten immediately, they can be stored in the 'fridge but always ensure they are properly reheated before being eaten


7 comments:

  1. Do you make your own, or buy them?

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  2. Many thanks, they sound and look delicious. I would have a go but hubby would not eat them, he is spoilt. I love mushy peas, gravy, liver and especially enjoy steak puddings, but usually have those on the odd occasion that we eat out. I absolutely love your blog and the work you have put in the garden in such a short time. take care Love Andie xxx

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  3. Ta! This was very interesting to read.

    Hugs!

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  4. It sounds delicious-I may have to try making one!

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  5. The ones I have seen in Canada have a hard boiled egg in the middle.

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  6. My husband's family found their favorite treat, these pies, in Windsor, Ontario. Now that the Scotland-born generation is gone, their children continue the tradition.
    Ellen in N.W. Ohio

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  7. They have pretty much disappeared in Western Canada.

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